Team Project

Collaboration and public scholarship are two commonly-held values for digital scholars; we share those values in the Mellon Scholars Program. As the capstone project to the IDS 180-181 course sequence, students will develop an online digital portfolio cataloging their research throughout the year. Students will be provided with datasets, and will be responsible for documenting the three phases of a digital research project (sources, processing, presentation). Through this project, students will learn about both traditional (annotated bibliography) and nontraditional (data visualization)  humanities research methods, from developing a research question to narrating your findings for the public.

Project milestones will be spaced evenly throughout the two semester sequence to ensure timely completion and mastery of the relevant skills. While each team’s end product will be different—will ask and answer different questions and present analyses in different ways—each project portfolio will contain the following:

 

  • A team charter
(fall)
  • An annotated bibliography
(fall)
  • A data critique (500-750 words)
(fall)
  • A short (3-5 objects) digital exhibit
(fall)
  • A web site, designed by the team to host portfolios
(fall)
  • A narrative (1,500 words) that describes your research– your data, your questions, your methodology– for the public
(spring)
  • 6 data visualizations that explicitly ask and answer humanities research questions
(spring)
  • A short “About” page
(spring)
  • A whitepaper (submitted privately)
(spring)
  • A grant proposal
(spring)

 

Each of these assignments will be described in great detail over the course of the year, and detailed rubrics will be provided for each. While this last may seem overwhelming, please keep in mind that many of these assignments will be completed during class-time.  
This project is meant to be a record of what you learn over the course of the year, applying the skills and programs that we learn in class to a real-life data set, developed by cultural heritage institutions from around the country. Don’t think of this project as a “final,” but as a living and breathing record of your work, that will evolve throughout the year as you hone your digital research skills.